Anadiplosis

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Repeating the same word(s) at the end of a sentence or a clause and in the beginning of the following sentence or clause is known as anadiplosis. For example: “The general who became a slave; the...

Repeating the same word(s) at the end of a sentence or a clause and in the beginning of the following sentence or clause is known as anadiplosis. For example: “The general who became a slave; the slave who became a gladiator; the gladiator who defied an Emperor.” It’s a good way to give rhythm to your writing.

The word anadiplosis comes from Greek anadiplōsis meaning “repetition” or “to double”.

Examples of anadiplosis

Example of anadiplosis in Richard II by William Shakespeare
Act V Scene I

“The love of wicked men converts to fear;
That fear to hate, and hate turns one or both
To worthy danger and deserved death.”

Example of anadiplosis in Richard III by William Shakespeare
Act V Scene III

“My conscience hath a thousand several tongues,
And every tongue brings in a several tale,
And every tale condemns me for a villain.”

Example of anadiplosis in An Irish Airman foresees his Death by William Butler Yeats

“The years to come seemed waste of breath,
A waste of breath the years behind
In balance with this life, this death.”

Example of anadiplosis in The Isles of Greece by Lord Byron

“The mountains look on Marathon—
And Marathon looks on the sea…”

"Fear is the path to the dark side. Fear leads to anger. Anger leads to hate. Hate leads to suffering. I sense much fear in you."
(Frank Oz as Yoda in Star Wars Episode 1: The Phantom Menace)

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